0Comments

IOO stuff about job hunting is usually good to read who agrees?

Listening to career-oriented podcasts is a great way to absorb the wealth of knowledge from the speakers you’re listening to while drawing from their successes. They also help to pass the time while being productive when you’re on the go. If you’re looking to inject some inspiration into your daily media consumption, here is a list of eight inspiring career podcasts to listen to today.

1. Second Life

In this podcast, Hillary Kerr spotlights inspiring women who have found extreme success in their “second life” and have mastered serious career pivots. With high profile and awe-inspiring guests like Eva Chan, Mandy Moore and Busy Philips, this podcast features women who are willing to discuss how they’ve found success and fulfillment while sharing their vulnerabilities and honest advice too. If you’re considering making a leap into something new, this podcast is sure to inject some needed inspiration.

2. How I Built This 

In this podcast, Guy Raz highlights the journeys of many successful companies as they built their empires’ from the ground up. Innovators, idealists and entrepreneurs share the pivotal moments that have shaped their careers and the movements that brought them through their journeys toward success. Guests like Sarah Blakely and Jerry Murrel explain how they got from point A to Z in both their personal and professional lives.

3. WorkLife with Adam Grant 

In this TED original podcast, Adam Grant explores the minds of people who are reinventing the way we understand work. He shares key insights from his conversations on how to enjoy the work we’re doing and make it more worthwhile. Guests include inspirational speakers like Trevor Noah and Richard Branson. If you’re feeling stuck and looking to make sense of your career, this podcast could be for you.

4. Don’t Keep Your Day Job 

This podcast explores the lives of entrepreneurs who have found success while following their passions. Cathy Heller is the host of this podcast and each week she encourages listeners to find their true purpose. Some notable guests include Howard Schultz, Daniel Pink and Angela Duckworth. This podcast is a great place to learn practical first steps needed to build a career that allows you to do what you love.

5. IN PURSUIT

IN PURSUIT was created by Glassdoor itself as its first inaugural podcast! The host, Amy Elisa Jackson, discusses candid, personal reflections from guests who are evolving to meet the challenges life throws at them. In the first episode, they speak with researcher and star of her own Netflix special, Brené Brown, on the topic of courage and vulnerability as the necessary pillars for strong leadership. They also delve into Brown’s personal journey through sobriety. If you’re looking to kick your career up a notch while improving yourself on a personal level, this podcast is for you.

6. The Smart Passive Income Podcast

In this podcast, Pat Flynn explores his tried and true methods for building an online business and optimizing it for passive income. In some episodes, he features himself and shares from his wealth of knowledge, and in others, he features guest speakers to share their strategies for building passive wealth. If you’re someone who’s itching to build a side hustle or online business but feel overwhelmed just thinking about it, this podcast can provide tactical first steps and help guide you through the process.

7. The Tim Ferriss Show 

The Tim Ferriss Show is the podcast of all career inspiring podcasts and is often ranked as the #1 business podcast on Apple Podcasts. The host, Tim Ferriss, features successful guests from different areas and deconstructs what “top performance” means and how it’s been achieved through deep and meaningful interview questions. Notable guests include Arnold Schwarzenegger, LeBron James, Ray Dalio and many more.  If you’re looking to find tools, tactics and routines you can apply to your own life, this podcast is for you.

8. We Study Billionaires 

In the podcast “We Study Billionaires”, Preston Pysh and Stig Brodersen explore the lives and strategies of self-made billionaires who’ve built their wealth investing in the stock market. Notable guests include Warren Buffet and Ray Dalio. If you’re someone interested in further building your wealth through investing, and looking to learn from the best, then tune in to this podcast.

With the new year just around the corner, now is a better time than ever to get re-motivated. Whether you’re trying to make it onto the next billionaire watch list, or looking to gain clarity around what success means to you, these podcasts will have something for everyone. Happy listening!

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by MMS Group
0Comments

Always like to share anything related to getting a job

Listening to career-oriented podcasts is a great way to absorb the wealth of knowledge from the speakers you’re listening to while drawing from their successes. They also help to pass the time while being productive when you’re on the go. If you’re looking to inject some inspiration into your daily media consumption, here is a list of eight inspiring career podcasts to listen to today.

1. Second Life

In this podcast, Hillary Kerr spotlights inspiring women who have found extreme success in their “second life” and have mastered serious career pivots. With high profile and awe-inspiring guests like Eva Chan, Mandy Moore and Busy Philips, this podcast features women who are willing to discuss how they’ve found success and fulfillment while sharing their vulnerabilities and honest advice too. If you’re considering making a leap into something new, this podcast is sure to inject some needed inspiration.

2. How I Built This 

In this podcast, Guy Raz highlights the journeys of many successful companies as they built their empires’ from the ground up. Innovators, idealists and entrepreneurs share the pivotal moments that have shaped their careers and the movements that brought them through their journeys toward success. Guests like Sarah Blakely and Jerry Murrel explain how they got from point A to Z in both their personal and professional lives.

3. WorkLife with Adam Grant 

In this TED original podcast, Adam Grant explores the minds of people who are reinventing the way we understand work. He shares key insights from his conversations on how to enjoy the work we’re doing and make it more worthwhile. Guests include inspirational speakers like Trevor Noah and Richard Branson. If you’re feeling stuck and looking to make sense of your career, this podcast could be for you.

4. Don’t Keep Your Day Job 

This podcast explores the lives of entrepreneurs who have found success while following their passions. Cathy Heller is the host of this podcast and each week she encourages listeners to find their true purpose. Some notable guests include Howard Schultz, Daniel Pink and Angela Duckworth. This podcast is a great place to learn practical first steps needed to build a career that allows you to do what you love.

5. IN PURSUIT

IN PURSUIT was created by Glassdoor itself as its first inaugural podcast! The host, Amy Elisa Jackson, discusses candid, personal reflections from guests who are evolving to meet the challenges life throws at them. In the first episode, they speak with researcher and star of her own Netflix special, Brené Brown, on the topic of courage and vulnerability as the necessary pillars for strong leadership. They also delve into Brown’s personal journey through sobriety. If you’re looking to kick your career up a notch while improving yourself on a personal level, this podcast is for you.

6. The Smart Passive Income Podcast

In this podcast, Pat Flynn explores his tried and true methods for building an online business and optimizing it for passive income. In some episodes, he features himself and shares from his wealth of knowledge, and in others, he features guest speakers to share their strategies for building passive wealth. If you’re someone who’s itching to build a side hustle or online business but feel overwhelmed just thinking about it, this podcast can provide tactical first steps and help guide you through the process.

7. The Tim Ferriss Show 

The Tim Ferriss Show is the podcast of all career inspiring podcasts and is often ranked as the #1 business podcast on Apple Podcasts. The host, Tim Ferriss, features successful guests from different areas and deconstructs what “top performance” means and how it’s been achieved through deep and meaningful interview questions. Notable guests include Arnold Schwarzenegger, LeBron James, Ray Dalio and many more.  If you’re looking to find tools, tactics and routines you can apply to your own life, this podcast is for you.

8. We Study Billionaires 

In the podcast “We Study Billionaires”, Preston Pysh and Stig Brodersen explore the lives and strategies of self-made billionaires who’ve built their wealth investing in the stock market. Notable guests include Warren Buffet and Ray Dalio. If you’re someone interested in further building your wealth through investing, and looking to learn from the best, then tune in to this podcast.

With the new year just around the corner, now is a better time than ever to get re-motivated. Whether you’re trying to make it onto the next billionaire watch list, or looking to gain clarity around what success means to you, these podcasts will have something for everyone. Happy listening!

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by MMS Group
0Comments

Absolutely want to share everything about job search

In spite of employers increasing investment in diversity and inclusion, a new Glassdoor survey reveals that 61 percent, or about three in five U.S. employees have witnessed or experienced discrimination based on age, race, gender or LGBTQ identity in the workplace. The 2019 Diversity and Inclusion Study was conducted online by The Harris Poll among over 1,100 U.S. employees and revealed the prevalence of discrimination at work. Furthermore, in surveying employees across the U.S., UK, France and Germany, issues of belonging are common.

Among the key findings of the survey, employees revealed:

  • Employed adults in the U.S. have experienced or witnessed discrimination (61 percent) more than those in the UK (55 percent), France (43 percent) and Germany (37 percent) respectively
  • Forty-two percent of employed adults in the U.S. have experienced or witnessed racism in the workplace; the highest percentage of the four countries surveyed
  • Ageism is the most experienced or witnessed form of discrimination in both the U.S. (45 percent) and UK (39 percent)
  • Gender is the most experienced or witnessed form of discrimination in both France (30 percent) and Germany (24 percent)
  • Half (50 percent) of employed adults across the four countries believe their employer should do more to increase diversity and inclusion

“Creating a company culture that celebrates and respects people for their diverse backgrounds and experiences should be a top priority for all employers,” said Carina Cortez, Glassdoor’s chief people officer. “Employees must feel comfortable bringing their full selves to work, without the fear of prejudice or ridicule, whether intentional or not. It’s critical for employers to actively listen to how their employees feel about what it’s like to work at their company. More importantly, employers must be willing and ready to take action to foster a workplace environment in which all people feel they belong.”

During a time of record-low unemployment, the U.S. is experiencing one of the best times in history to find a job. This also means that companies are being evaluated even more closely by career-minded job seekers for signs of mission-aligned values, a thriving company culture and a people-first approach. Our survey shows that workplace discrimination, whether based on race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation or identity, to name a few, persists.

“While it’s troubling to see that a majority of people have experienced or witnessed discrimination at work, with more awareness comes more action to ensure greater inclusivity in the workplace,” adds Cortez. “The results of this survey should be a wake-up call for workers and employers to foster a more inclusive culture to end any form of discrimination at work.

Inside the Data

As we dug into the data further, the survey revealed that men in the U.S. are more likely to witness or experience discrimination than women at work. In fact, 50 percent of men witnessed or experienced ageism as opposed to 38 percent of women respondents. Furthermore, 38 percent of men witnessed or experience LGBTQ discrimination compared to 28 percent of women.

Another key finding of the survey revealed that younger employed adults have more experiences of discrimination at work. Over half (52 percent) of employed U.S. adults between the ages of 18 and 34 report gender discrimination at work, falling to less than three in ten (29 percent) of employed adults aged 55+.

How Companies Are Tackling Diversity & Inclusion

A bright spot in the conversation around diversity and inclusion is the heightened level of investment employers are making both within their companies and on Glassdoor. Glassdoor’s Economic Research team found that over the past year, hiring for roles dedicated to fostering more diverse and inclusive workplaces has increased 30 percent.

Three-quarters (77 percent) of U.S. employees say their company employs a diverse workforce; though over half (55 percent) believe their company should do more to improve D&I. Over six in 10 (64 percent) U.S. employees say their company is investing more in D&I now than it has in years past

Within their ranks, both large and small companies are investing in online courses, trainings, open dialogues, employee resource groups and company-wide diversity education. Employers inducing 3M, Babbel, Eli Lilly, Visa, Airbnb, Docusign and more are developing innovative strategies to promote diverse hiring practices as well as retention tools. It’s no surprise that these companies and others are investing in inclusivity not only because it’s the right thing to do but also because the candidates of tomorrow truly care. More than six in 10 (62 percent) U.S. employees between the ages of 18-34 — which includes Millennials and Gen Z — believe their company should do more to increase diversity and inclusion.

“At Glassdoor, we encourage our employees to bring their authentic selves to work,” says Cortez. “We empower our workers through employee resource groups, company-wide diversity-driven speaker series and monthly programming that not only educates, but also celebrates, diverse communities and employees.”

The 2019 Diversity & Inclusion study reveals that while progress is being made, there is much more work to do to eliminate discrimination in the workplace. Identifying the problems and recognizing companies striving for equality gives hope that we will begin to see more diverse and welcoming workforces in the future.

Learn More

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by MMS Group
0Comments

How do you feel about this information as it talks about job search

In spite of employers increasing investment in diversity and inclusion, a new Glassdoor survey reveals that 61 percent, or about three in five U.S. employees have witnessed or experienced discrimination based on age, race, gender or LGBTQ identity in the workplace. The 2019 Diversity and Inclusion Study was conducted online by The Harris Poll among over 1,100 U.S. employees and revealed the prevalence of discrimination at work. Furthermore, in surveying employees across the U.S., UK, France and Germany, issues of belonging are common.

Among the key findings of the survey, employees revealed:

  • Employed adults in the U.S. have experienced or witnessed discrimination (61 percent) more than those in the UK (55 percent), France (43 percent) and Germany (37 percent) respectively
  • Forty-two percent of employed adults in the U.S. have experienced or witnessed racism in the workplace; the highest percentage of the four countries surveyed
  • Ageism is the most experienced or witnessed form of discrimination in both the U.S. (45 percent) and UK (39 percent)
  • Gender is the most experienced or witnessed form of discrimination in both France (30 percent) and Germany (24 percent)
  • Half (50 percent) of employed adults across the four countries believe their employer should do more to increase diversity and inclusion

“Creating a company culture that celebrates and respects people for their diverse backgrounds and experiences should be a top priority for all employers,” said Carina Cortez, Glassdoor’s chief people officer. “Employees must feel comfortable bringing their full selves to work, without the fear of prejudice or ridicule, whether intentional or not. It’s critical for employers to actively listen to how their employees feel about what it’s like to work at their company. More importantly, employers must be willing and ready to take action to foster a workplace environment in which all people feel they belong.”

During a time of record-low unemployment, the U.S. is experiencing one of the best times in history to find a job. This also means that companies are being evaluated even more closely by career-minded job seekers for signs of mission-aligned values, a thriving company culture and a people-first approach. Our survey shows that workplace discrimination, whether based on race, ethnicity, age, gender, sexual orientation or identity, to name a few, persists.

“While it’s troubling to see that a majority of people have experienced or witnessed discrimination at work, with more awareness comes more action to ensure greater inclusivity in the workplace,” adds Cortez. “The results of this survey should be a wake-up call for workers and employers to foster a more inclusive culture to end any form of discrimination at work.

Inside the Data

As we dug into the data further, the survey revealed that men in the U.S. are more likely to witness or experience discrimination than women at work. In fact, 50 percent of men witnessed or experienced ageism as opposed to 38 percent of women respondents. Furthermore, 38 percent of men witnessed or experience LGBTQ discrimination compared to 28 percent of women.

Another key finding of the survey revealed that younger employed adults have more experiences of discrimination at work. Over half (52 percent) of employed U.S. adults between the ages of 18 and 34 report gender discrimination at work, falling to less than three in ten (29 percent) of employed adults aged 55+.

How Companies Are Tackling Diversity & Inclusion

A bright spot in the conversation around diversity and inclusion is the heightened level of investment employers are making both within their companies and on Glassdoor. Glassdoor’s Economic Research team found that over the past year, hiring for roles dedicated to fostering more diverse and inclusive workplaces has increased 30 percent.

Three-quarters (77 percent) of U.S. employees say their company employs a diverse workforce; though over half (55 percent) believe their company should do more to improve D&I. Over six in 10 (64 percent) U.S. employees say their company is investing more in D&I now than it has in years past

Within their ranks, both large and small companies are investing in online courses, trainings, open dialogues, employee resource groups and company-wide diversity education. Employers inducing 3M, Babbel, Eli Lilly, Visa, Airbnb, Docusign and more are developing innovative strategies to promote diverse hiring practices as well as retention tools. It’s no surprise that these companies and others are investing in inclusivity not only because it’s the right thing to do but also because the candidates of tomorrow truly care. More than six in 10 (62 percent) U.S. employees between the ages of 18-34 — which includes Millennials and Gen Z — believe their company should do more to increase diversity and inclusion.

“At Glassdoor, we encourage our employees to bring their authentic selves to work,” says Cortez. “We empower our workers through employee resource groups, company-wide diversity-driven speaker series and monthly programming that not only educates, but also celebrates, diverse communities and employees.”

The 2019 Diversity & Inclusion study reveals that while progress is being made, there is much more work to do to eliminate discrimination in the workplace. Identifying the problems and recognizing companies striving for equality gives hope that we will begin to see more diverse and welcoming workforces in the future.

Learn More

Top Companies for Diversity & Inclusion

New D&I Jobs For You

Inside Sales | Salary, Comm, & Bonus | Interview NOV 19
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by MMS Group
0Comments

Anyone like this post as much as us ?

Chances are, if you’re a female worker, you’ve encountered gender discrimination. It can be overt, such as sexual harassment, getting fired because you’re pregnant, or being paid less than men. It can also be more subtle, such as being passed over for a promotion in favor of a male colleague, not being hired into a historically male occupation or not getting offered career-enhancing assignments because you’re seen as being on the “mommy track.” 

The good news is that new laws protecting women in the workplace continue to reach governors’ desks every year. You are allowed to assert your rights, to fight gender discrimination and any retaliation that results from speaking up. 

1. Harassment: Bad behavior doesn’t belong at work

According to a 2017 study by Gender & Society, the lost productivity of each sexual harassment victim amounts to as much as $22,500 a year. With harassment affecting the bottom line, more forward-thinking companies have invited employees to become part of the solution by instituting “bystander intervention” training.

Following #MeToo, more employers adopted harassment training, but training works best when companies commit to changing their culture and making employees partners in the process. Bystander intervention training empowers male and female employees to identify and respond to inappropriate actions or comments. Employee working groups can help identify issues and propose solutions, and follow-up processes can track outcomes of new policies and practices. 

If you don’t understand your company’s harassment complaint process, talk to your supervisor. At the very least, policies should encourage employees to immediately report when they witness inappropriate behavior and allow them to demand prompt investigation without fearing retaliation. The procedures should also support the alleged harasser’s right to be heard and investigated without a rush to judgment. 

A workplace culture that condones or ignores harassment — especially one that celebrates locker room talk and language — only encourages continued bad behavior. You can join the movement to redeem the workplace by helping your employer define expectations, create behavior guidelines and incentive programs, and reinforce appropriate behaviors. 

2. Opportunities: Your job has nothing to do with your gender

Outside of the male sports teams, nobody has the right to tell you that you can’t do a job because of your gender. 

Women have historically been passed over for promotions and encountered barriers to entering certain occupations, but things are changing, from STEM programs for girls to engineering programs at women’s colleges. A handful of technology and manufacturing companies boast women executives, but women who enter predominantly male occupations are still subject to tokenism, from pressure to perform better to social isolation. 

If you believe that you are being denied equal opportunity, promotions, or equal pay, you need to take action. Gather your resume and performance evaluations, get copies of your paystubs, ask your employer to provide a salary survey, ask your coworkers what they are making, write a chronology of events addressing your efforts to obtain fair opportunity, promotions, and/or equal pay, and consult a lawyer.

If you believe you were denied a job, promotion, or some other opportunity because of your gender, take action to change the corporate culture. Celebrate the achievements of women and minorities so that others are encouraged to reach further and aim higher.

3. Pay: What you make doesn’t depend on your chromosomes

Women earn, on average, less than men for similar work, and minority women earn even less. This is against the law. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 abolished wage disparity based on gender when both males and females are working jobs that require “equal skill, effort, and responsibility, and which are performed under similar working conditions.”

Pay disparity continues to exist, however. It starts with the hiring process. Companies just need to know that you’re qualified to do the job for which you’re applying. Requesting your salary history lets them justify paying you less than your male coworkers, continuing a historic pattern of pay inequity against women.

Don’t share salary history with prospective employers unless there’s a compelling reason to do so. In California, employers can no longer ask for salary history. Don’t accept less pay than equally qualified workers doing the same or similar work. Ask your male colleagues what they’re making. If the company is willing to pay them so much for the work you do, it should be paying you that same amount.

4.  Parenting: Having kids doesn’t make you less qualified 

Parenting should never be a job disqualifier. Some employers wrongly believe that if you’re a mom, you’re not as dedicated to your job as the guy sitting at the desk next to yours. Not true and not fair. If anything, parents are often better at managing their time, resolving conflicts and keeping things in perspective. 

If you believe you’ve been treated differently simply because you have children, report your concerns to HR or file a complaint with the appropriate state or federal agency.   


5.  Pregnancy: Discrimination should not be expected when you’re expecting

If you’re expecting, you can’t be discriminated against over your pregnancy. The Pregnancy Disability Act of 1978 bars discrimination “on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions.” Employers with fewer than 15 employees are exempt, and employers are not obligated to provide medical coverage for elective abortions unless the mother’s life is threatened. They are required to provide disability and sick leave for women recovering from an abortion.

Your employer must provide reasonable accommodations during your pregnancy, including modifying job assignments if required by your medical restrictions. In general, you should not lose benefits, pay or job opportunities because you’re pregnant. 

The Bottom Line

If you observe behavior in your workplace that doesn’t seem right, don’t ignore it. The longer victims or witnesses wait to take action, the harder it will be to remember and capture what happened. Document as much as you can as soon as you can. You can now download mobile phone apps that will walk you through the documentation process and save your observations until you need them.

When a violation is verified, employer discipline must be prompt and proportionate to the behavior. Employers should ensure that discipline is consistent and doesn’t give or create the appearance of undue favor to any employee. 

Genie Harrison is a Los Angeles lawyer representing, among her clients, employees discriminated against or harassed in the workplace. She is the creator of “Incident Genie,” an app that helps employees document, timestamp and save accounts of illegal workplace actions.

banner Artboard Copy 3

by MMS Group
0Comments

We think stuff about job hunting is usually good to read who agrees?

Chances are, if you’re a female worker, you’ve encountered gender discrimination. It can be overt, such as sexual harassment, getting fired because you’re pregnant, or being paid less than men. It can also be more subtle, such as being passed over for a promotion in favor of a male colleague, not being hired into a historically male occupation or not getting offered career-enhancing assignments because you’re seen as being on the “mommy track.” 

The good news is that new laws protecting women in the workplace continue to reach governors’ desks every year. You are allowed to assert your rights, to fight gender discrimination and any retaliation that results from speaking up. 

1. Harassment: Bad behavior doesn’t belong at work

According to a 2017 study by Gender & Society, the lost productivity of each sexual harassment victim amounts to as much as $22,500 a year. With harassment affecting the bottom line, more forward-thinking companies have invited employees to become part of the solution by instituting “bystander intervention” training.

Following #MeToo, more employers adopted harassment training, but training works best when companies commit to changing their culture and making employees partners in the process. Bystander intervention training empowers male and female employees to identify and respond to inappropriate actions or comments. Employee working groups can help identify issues and propose solutions, and follow-up processes can track outcomes of new policies and practices. 

If you don’t understand your company’s harassment complaint process, talk to your supervisor. At the very least, policies should encourage employees to immediately report when they witness inappropriate behavior and allow them to demand prompt investigation without fearing retaliation. The procedures should also support the alleged harasser’s right to be heard and investigated without a rush to judgment. 

A workplace culture that condones or ignores harassment — especially one that celebrates locker room talk and language — only encourages continued bad behavior. You can join the movement to redeem the workplace by helping your employer define expectations, create behavior guidelines and incentive programs, and reinforce appropriate behaviors. 

2. Opportunities: Your job has nothing to do with your gender

Outside of the male sports teams, nobody has the right to tell you that you can’t do a job because of your gender. 

Women have historically been passed over for promotions and encountered barriers to entering certain occupations, but things are changing, from STEM programs for girls to engineering programs at women’s colleges. A handful of technology and manufacturing companies boast women executives, but women who enter predominantly male occupations are still subject to tokenism, from pressure to perform better to social isolation. 

If you believe that you are being denied equal opportunity, promotions, or equal pay, you need to take action. Gather your resume and performance evaluations, get copies of your paystubs, ask your employer to provide a salary survey, ask your coworkers what they are making, write a chronology of events addressing your efforts to obtain fair opportunity, promotions, and/or equal pay, and consult a lawyer.

If you believe you were denied a job, promotion, or some other opportunity because of your gender, take action to change the corporate culture. Celebrate the achievements of women and minorities so that others are encouraged to reach further and aim higher.

3. Pay: What you make doesn’t depend on your chromosomes

Women earn, on average, less than men for similar work, and minority women earn even less. This is against the law. The Equal Pay Act of 1963 abolished wage disparity based on gender when both males and females are working jobs that require “equal skill, effort, and responsibility, and which are performed under similar working conditions.”

Pay disparity continues to exist, however. It starts with the hiring process. Companies just need to know that you’re qualified to do the job for which you’re applying. Requesting your salary history lets them justify paying you less than your male coworkers, continuing a historic pattern of pay inequity against women.

Don’t share salary history with prospective employers unless there’s a compelling reason to do so. In California, employers can no longer ask for salary history. Don’t accept less pay than equally qualified workers doing the same or similar work. Ask your male colleagues what they’re making. If the company is willing to pay them so much for the work you do, it should be paying you that same amount.

4.  Parenting: Having kids doesn’t make you less qualified 

Parenting should never be a job disqualifier. Some employers wrongly believe that if you’re a mom, you’re not as dedicated to your job as the guy sitting at the desk next to yours. Not true and not fair. If anything, parents are often better at managing their time, resolving conflicts and keeping things in perspective. 

If you believe you’ve been treated differently simply because you have children, report your concerns to HR or file a complaint with the appropriate state or federal agency.   


5.  Pregnancy: Discrimination should not be expected when you’re expecting

If you’re expecting, you can’t be discriminated against over your pregnancy. The Pregnancy Disability Act of 1978 bars discrimination “on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions.” Employers with fewer than 15 employees are exempt, and employers are not obligated to provide medical coverage for elective abortions unless the mother’s life is threatened. They are required to provide disability and sick leave for women recovering from an abortion.

Your employer must provide reasonable accommodations during your pregnancy, including modifying job assignments if required by your medical restrictions. In general, you should not lose benefits, pay or job opportunities because you’re pregnant. 

The Bottom Line

If you observe behavior in your workplace that doesn’t seem right, don’t ignore it. The longer victims or witnesses wait to take action, the harder it will be to remember and capture what happened. Document as much as you can as soon as you can. You can now download mobile phone apps that will walk you through the documentation process and save your observations until you need them.

When a violation is verified, employer discipline must be prompt and proportionate to the behavior. Employers should ensure that discipline is consistent and doesn’t give or create the appearance of undue favor to any employee. 

Genie Harrison is a Los Angeles lawyer representing, among her clients, employees discriminated against or harassed in the workplace. She is the creator of “Incident Genie,” an app that helps employees document, timestamp and save accounts of illegal workplace actions.

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by MMS Group
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IOO information about tips to finding a job is usually good to read

We like to tell ourselves that age is simply a number, especially those of us showing a few gray hairs and moving a little slower. However, if you’ve been looking for a job or trying to move up the corporate ladder, your age could be an obstacle. 

Think about the last time you lost a workplace opportunity. Did the hiring manager think you were too old? Were you passed over for a promotion in favor of someone clearly less grizzled?  If your age was used against you, you might have an age discrimination claim.

What is ageism?

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) defines age discrimination as “treating an applicant or employee less favorably because of his or her age.” The federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act protects individuals over the age of 40 in a range of employment actions including hiring, firing, pay, promotions, job assignments, layoffs, trainings and benefits. 

The law may be crystal clear about the protections older workers have, but actually proving ageism can be tricky. Let’s say you weren’t offered a job for which you applied. How will you be able to prove that the decision was based on your age, rather than your ability, experience, or other legitimate job qualifications? If a younger co-worker got the promotion you were angling for, can you honestly make a case that the company’s decision was driven by age considerations, as opposed to something else?

Who does ageism affect?

Sadly, age discrimination in the workplace is all too real and much too common. A recent study by insurer Hiscox found that one in five workers age 40 and older reported experiencing discrimination in the workplace because of their age. Of those workers, less than half filed a charge or made a complaint, either because they didn’t know how to do it or because they were worried about negative repercussions in the workplace. 

To make matters worse, workers who saw another worker being subjected to age discrimination tended to keep their mouths shut. More than half didn’t say anything because they were afraid of retaliation from their employer. 

This isn’t an insignificant issue. More than two-thirds of study respondents 65 or younger said they plan to continue working after they turn 66, but almost half of them said they had left a company due to experiencing or witnessing age discrimination.

So what’s an older worker to do? 

Educate yourself. Most respondents to the Hiscox study said that ageism wasn’t even included in bias training they got from their employers. If you don’t know your rights, how can you be expected to assert them? Here’s what you need to know.

The Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA) makes it unlawful for employers “to fail or refuse to hire or to discharge any individual or otherwise discriminate against any individual with respect to his compensation, terms, conditions, or privileges of employment, because of such individual’s age.” Employers can’t “limit, segregate, or classify… employees in any way which would deprive or tend to deprive any individual of employment opportunities or otherwise adversely affect his status as an employee, because of such individual’s age.” Finally, it’s against the law for employers to discriminate against employees or applicants because they have “opposed any practice made unlawful by this section, or …. made a charge, testified, assisted, or participated in any manner in an investigation, proceeding, or litigation under this chapter.” 

Bottom line: Your age can’t be the reason you didn’t get a job offer or a promotion, nor can it be used to reduce your pay or benefits, and any employer who retaliates against you for standing up for yourself is breaking the law. 

Take action. If you suspect that you’ve been subject to age-based discrimination, take action. If you feel comfortable doing so, start with your HR department and give them a chance to investigate. You can also file a claim with the EEOC or an appropriate state agency. 

An investigation might turn up facts that support your claim, in which case you might have another chance at that job or promotion, or you may be entitled to monetary compensation. At a minimum, you should have answers to your questions — even if the answer is that someone else was a better-qualified candidate.

Be proactive. Even when companies don’t intend to discriminate, we know that recruiters subconsciously know who they’re looking for. If a resume shouts, “I’ve been around a long time,” they may be disinclined to move it forward. I advise my clients to provide information that conveys skills and experience without focusing on dates. Discretion is not dishonesty.

For older workers with significant educational or professional backgrounds, employers might assume that there are high salary expectations. If this isn’t the case, be direct. In your cover letter, make it clear that you’re happy to be paid whatever they’ve budgeted for the position. You can even point out the bargain they’ll be getting, given your insights and years of experience.

Stay positive. A recent study in Dermatology Times found many older patients seeking anti-aging procedures because of their concerns about age discrimination. The study found a negative relationship between perceived age discrimination and self-rated health, including lower self-esteem. It concluded that psychological counseling might be more helpful than dermatological intervention.

The more you understand your own goals and aspirations, the better prepared you will be to weather the verities of the job market. Stay positive and take good care of yourself as you apply for jobs or seek advancement in your career. Being educated about your legal rights will provide additional tools and support on your journey. 

Gerald Sauer, founding partner at Sauer & Wagner LLP, is a veteran civil trial attorney who specializes in business, employment and intellectual property law.

 

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by MMS Group
MMS Group
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How do you feel about this article as it discusses finding a job

Vinny Eng was at the top of his game in his restaurant career. He was recognized as one of Food & Wine Magazine’s sommeliers of the year. He was a skilled and respected general manager of Tartine Manufactory in San Francisco. Then, one day, he got an offer to become the organizing director for Suzy Loftus’ campaign for San Francisco district attorney. It didn’t take long for him to say yes.

Why would he change his life so radically?

“When the universe calls you, you show up. You find a way,” he tells host Amy Elisa Jackson in this episode of IN PURSUIT. Vinny’s work has always revolved around community, whether in his early career in the theater, his success in the restaurant business, or his advocacy for people of color and LGBTQ rights.

“We are not others in a way that make us foreign to each other. Rather we are others in a way that presents an opportunity for us to discover how much we are alike,” he says. “Your wholeness as a human being is an asset. Like, present your whole self to everyone. Be consistent about how you present yourself regardless of what space you’re in.”

Vinny’s pivot — and his grace navigating it — is at the heart of what the IN PURSUIT podcast is all about: arriving at a split in life’s path and making your best choice. You’ll be inspired by Vinny’s experience as you share in his life lessons.

As Vinny says in the interview, “Don’t ever confine yourself to think that a pathway is the one that you have to commit to. Trust when people show up for your life and trust when people give you the invitation to do something wildly outside anything you ever imagined. And if it feels good in your heart, go after it, go for it. Because when you take a risk in your personal and professional career, people will show up, and support you, and push you, and hold you accountable.”

Listen and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts.  IN PURSUIT features candid, personal reflections from guests who are looking for answers and evolving to meet the challenges life throws at them. You’ll get inspiring conversations about life and career.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Welcome to IN PURSUIT the podcast from Glassdoor. I’m Amy Lisa Jackson. In every episode, we share the real stories of extraordinary people navigating life’s most pivotal moments at the intersection of the personal and professional.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Have you ever wondered if you could quit your job and make a complete 180 degree turn? Would you be willing to walk away from a wildly successful career to follow your passion? These are just two of the burning questions we have to ask Vinny Eng. Known as the general manager and wine director of one of San Francisco’s most vibrant restaurants, Tartine Manufactory, Vinny Eng left it all behind in April of this year. Spurred by the horrific death of his sister at the hands of police, Vinny left the restaurant world for the world of local government. His new role is as organizing director for Suzy Loftus’s campaign for San Francisco District Attorney. Let’s dig in more to learn a little bit about why he pivoted and how he’s navigating these new job jitters and the path that led to this moment.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Vinny, welcome to the show.

Vinny Eng: Thank you so much.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Before we dig into the career change, take us back. Did you always know you wanted to be a wine director? A sommelier? A man about restaurants.

Vinny Eng: Honestly, to tell you the truth, I moved to San Francisco in 2003 to work for a theater company.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Really?

Vinny Eng: Yeah. And the rent was too damn high in 2003 and so I started moonlighting at a restaurant just to make some extra money. And as you do in restaurants, you just sort of do what it takes to keep the service going.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Was that where you sort of discovered your passion for food and wine or what was it? Was there a moment, a dish, a glass of sauvignon something that just turned you on?

Vinny Eng: I wished there was a specific inflection point. But I’ll tell you, it wasn’t an object that was like a relationship.

Amy Elisa Jackson: How so?

Vinny Eng: Your restaurant becomes your family. You hustle, you work hard, you get through the weeds and at the end of the shift everyone looks at each other like hey, we did it, we got through it.

Amy Elisa Jackson: And so how did you go from, what was family and what was really sort of relationship-building to building this amazing career as wine director? I mean, that’s not something you really stumble into. I would imagine.

Vinny Eng: No, no, no. You sort of find yourselves in situations where you realize that you have an opportunity. And so I was being mentored by my then general manager, Alex Fox, and he decided to make a career change and put in his notice. And in that moment, we all looked around and the chefs and the owners looked at me and they said, “Hey, you’ve been here long enough and you understand sort of what makes this place tick and hum, why don’t you take over as general manager and wine director?”

Amy Elisa Jackson: Wow.

Vinny Eng: And I said, “You’re crazy.” I’ve never done either of those jobs before. And they said to me, “Well, it’s crazy industry, but you know everyone, you trust everyone, they trust you and our guests love you and you love them. And that’s what matters the most. So give it a shot and we’ll figure it out.” So it was very happenstance in a way. There was no planning for it. It was just sort of a collection of people who had faith in each other and who saw what the landscape was and said this is what the situation requires.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Wow. Now you were recognized as one of food and wines top sommeliers of 2019. How did that acknowledgment feel?

Vinny Eng: Incredibly humbling and also really validating, but not for me, but for this community in California. I made a concerted effort as I developed my approach to building wine programs in San Francisco to really focus on emerging voices in the Bay Area. I was really fortunate enough to be at a restaurant that really embraced the responsibility that we had to our local producers, our farmers. And we took that opportunity at Tartine, both at Bar Tartine and that Tartine Manufactory to codify those values in our operations.

Vinny Eng: And so we built a program that not only supported local emerging and new businesses, but also gave them the opportunity to be part of our platform so that new voices could reach new audiences, so that new emerging producers that were not prevalent in the wine industry found an opportunity to be in dialogue. We serve anywhere from 1500 to 2000 people a day at two Tartine locations, and even if 10% of those people paid attention that could be the difference for a local business in terms of new audience members and new subscribers and new mailing lists fans, and that could be enough.

Amy Elisa Jackson: That is powerful just to recognize your ability to sort of impact not only people’s businesses, but also their ability to expand their ability to reach more audiences, to also build community for themselves. How has your family background coming from Cambodia and migrating here vis-a-vis Thailand, how did that really shape your perspective, especially as you approach sort of building community through food and wine?

Vinny Eng: Food is at the center of every community. It’s something we do every day. It’s something that is both familiar and foreign, right? You sort of think about the rituals that connect the people that you love, and most of the ways in which we organize our gatherings are often around nourishing each other. In one way, I joke a lot with my former staff members, I say the quickest way to the heart is through the stomach.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Absolutely.

Vinny Eng: You feed someone and it just dissolves any notion of separation. Thank you for the generosity of nourishing me. Thank you for the generosity of feeding me. And so for me, so much of understanding what it meant also as the child of refugee immigrants is knowing that security and stability is also deeply rooted in access to food. The notion that we’re so blessed to have secure access to food, I’m so blessed. But there were moments growing up when food was not a luxury and also not a given, having to make a choice between paying rent or deciding whether we were having kidneys for dinner instead of a steak.

Vinny Eng: And so that vantage point created this deep sense of gratitude that I found myself professionally in a situation where I was serving things that were privileged, to have that cut, this particular heirloom variety of this vegetable, but also knowing that on the backend of that was a farm and the farmer and farmhands who are not seen. And so we think about the landscape of where we are in our present-day society and we have to keep thinking further upstream about what makes our life possible, who makes our life possible.

Amy Elisa Jackson: I love kind of recognizing the absolute privilege that it is to work in restaurants and work in the culinary world. But then as you sort of think about the other side of the coin as well, working the climb that professional ladder in the culinary world is definitely not easy. What’s been the biggest career challenge you faced as you’ve risen the ranks in the restaurant industry?

Vinny Eng: The better way to sort of frame it as what were the opportunities that were asking for awareness. The hospitality industry is that such a huge inflection point because so much of the dynamic in that space, so much of what, one of my greatest opportunities was re-imagining who a leader, what a leader looked like in that field. Especially in my little microcosm of the professional wine industry, there are very few individuals of color.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Very few.

Vinny Eng: And even fewer that have sort of navigated the pathway to become acknowledged for their ability. And validation to me is often, it’s not something to strive for per se. It sort of reinforces that your values are seen and are important. And for me the challenges were often being in rooms where I didn’t understand why my values weren’t represented. And representation is such a powerful way to create dialogue around what values are important in the space. It’s tremendously important to me that communities of color are represented in the hospitality industry, that queer communities are represented in the hospitality industry, not only in terms of who’s in the room, but more importantly who’s making decisions.

Amy Elisa Jackson: How did you navigate being the only one in the room? As a woman of color, I definitely can empathize and also relate to those feelings, but for you, how did you navigate that sense of otherness? Because you come off as so positive and very optimistic, how did you navigate the otherness?

Vinny Eng: The feeling of being an other is often presented as a prominent choice, but that’s the thing about a choice. You can make a different choice and I made a commitment to myself to find ways in which I could overcome the other, invite in people in the room to realize and acknowledge that there was a different choice that could be made. We are not others in a way that make us foreign to each other. Rather we are others in a way that presents an opportunity for us to discover how much we are alike.

Amy Elisa Jackson: As you think about your journey in the hospitality realm, when you look back to that time, things really took a turn in 2012. Life really pivoted for you. Walk us through what happened to your sister, Jazmyne, and sort of what diverted you on a different path in your life.

Vinny Eng: The universe is wide and vast and there’s so much that we can’t control.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Very true.

Vinny Eng: And in 2012 I got a text message from my sister, Nancy. She said, “Call me.” And we all have those moments in our lives where certain messages come in. You’re like oh my, okay, let’s go.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Something’s up— gird your loins.

Vinny Eng: Yeah. And I don’t think any of us ever, there’s no guide in life when tragedy hits. When tragedy hits and my sister Jazmyne had been struggling with a number of diagnoses, a number of mental health diagnoses. And in January of 2012, she was in crisis at a mental health facility down in Rosemead, in California and was involved in a critical situation with a number of sheriff deputies where she was killed. Killed in crisis, killed experiencing crisis. And sad, sad, very tragic.

Vinny Eng: And a truly American phenomenon, truly American phenomenon where we have failed so many communities in how we support and facilitate the recovery of individuals who live on a daily basis with illnesses that are invisible to our eyes. One in four officer-involved shootings involve someone in mental crisis and these deaths are entirely preventable, entirely preventable. And we have to take a look. These failures are not just failures in those moments, but failures in our communities to really diagnose and embrace the responsibility that we have to take care of each other before things go sideways.

Amy Elisa Jackson: What was your initial reaction after you spoke to your sister, Nancy, and you actually got the news? What was the feeling like? In that moment your just a brother, at the moment you’re just a man. You don’t have a platform, you don’t have a thought about policy or procedure. What was going through your head as a brother?

Vinny Eng: In that moment, everything rushed into my heart. There was nothing in my head. In that moment of just shock, deep shock. And sadness. I think my sister, Jazmyne, was… she had lived through the worst. She was a child that had experienced the worst of human behavior. She had lived for years as a child in labor camps in a genocidal country in Cambodia. And it was just deep and utter sadness that she came into this country, which I love so much and I continue to love so much. I love this country and I love this community and I love the people that I’ve… I love what it means to be American. I absolutely love what it means to be an American because this country embraced my family.

Vinny Eng: But in that moment of receiving that news, it was just heartbreak to think that my sister Jazmyne, my sister Nancy, my sister Susan, my mom, my dad escaped genocide, escaped terror, sought asylum, and was embraced by this country. They escaped harm at the hands of government agents only to experience tragedy in the hands of a government agency. But in that moment of a death, all of that intellectual processing goes out the door and the only thing that you really sort of experiences is deep and utter confusion.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Your family filed two lawsuits against LA County Sheriff Department and ultimately settled out of court. But what it or when did it feel like justice either hadn’t been served or was there a moment when you realized that the issues around mental health and policing were so much larger than this very tragic incident?

Vinny Eng: Justice is a beautiful complex fabric. And that moment where our family committed to a civil action is but one thread in this sort of fabric of what justice looks like. And justice evolves and is something that you constantly have to fight for. And I’ll tell you as one of hundreds of thousands of impacted family members throughout this country. The one thing that I hear constantly from other families impacted by police violence is the refrain is what we work for on a daily basis is to make sure that these things don’t ever happen to begin with.

Vinny Eng: It’s a big and beautiful family that we have not chosen to be part of, but we now embrace and accept and love each other. Every time we’re out in community activated, organizing for change around systems that have unnecessarily taken the lives of our loved ones. The thing that we hear all the time from each other is, I love you, I’m so sorry, what are you doing in your community to make sure this doesn’t happen again?

Vinny Eng: Justice is an orientation more so, it’s more than just an outcome. It’s an orientation. It’s an orientation and realizing that there’s no greater force than the power of devotion to each other and the ability to create action out of the love for the ones that we have lost.

Amy Elisa Jackson: How did you juggle the world of being an advocate, as well as having your full-time job? Those seem to be very challenging head and heart moments, right?

Vinny Eng: When the universe calls you, you show up, you find a way. When I look at all the working parents that I’m so grateful to have in my life, and I think to myself I mean I’m like single. I don’t have kids, but I look at the mothers and the fathers who just, they juggle and you just do it. You just get shit done. You get shit done because getting the work done matters. Making space for people to be whole, to be seen, to be supported, to be nourished, to be protected, to be safe, it matters.

Amy Elisa Jackson: So how did you navigate an average day when it’s a 12-hour day at the restaurant, yet you want to comfort another family in the community?

Vinny Eng: I think you must be really candid and transparent with the people in your lives. And I was really candid with my community locally about the struggles that I had with my grief, with my advocacy. I was really frank with my community about why it mattered that I was present or why I was absent.

Amy Elisa Jackson: I think there’s always a fear, right, of talking to your manager or your boss or your client about the demands that you have in your personal life and trying to navigate that professionally. But I think that that’s awesome and really poignant advice for all of us trying to juggle the personal and professional.

Vinny Eng: And I would say this, your wholeness as a human being is an asset. Present your whole self to everyone. Be consistent about how you present yourself regardless of what space you’re in so that you’re not signal switching. There’s one signal that’s really powerful and that’s our ability to tap into our humanity. This is the thing I learned from all of my friends who are parents, from all of my friends are successful advocates, from all of my friends who are amazing, get things done, policymakers. They’re consistent. So that people come to the table and they know what to expect, especially in times when they have to make really difficult asks of you. I’m coming at you and I know you’re going to disagree, but I know that you’re going to be consistently fair to hear me out and that’s why I’m coming to have uncomfortable conversations with you because we need to have a conversation about what is right and I know that you’ll be consistent.

Vinny Eng: And so in our lives both and personally, one of the most productive tools you can have is to be consistent in a way where people can come to you and have an uncomfortable conversation in service of something greater, in service of a larger good, in service of a public good. The mark of leadership is not how you get things done when things are comfortable. The mark of leadership is your ability to convene your community when things have gone crazy and people are mad as hell and they want to see something better.

Amy Elisa Jackson: When was the moment when you knew you needed to pivot and change career to become potentially a full-time social justice advocate or get into local government?

Vinny Eng: It’s not a pivot. When I made the transition to join Suzy Loftus’s campaign, for me it was an expansion. Look at the landscape of where you spend your time and who you spend it with and build the community to support your ability to make sure that every waking moment that you have is invested in an outcome that serves as many people as possible. And so when I got the phone call from Suzy and her staff hey, this crazy thing, there was no question. There was no question.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Really did you accept on the phone?

Vinny Eng: I did accept on the phone. I mean in my heart. In that moment I was like this is crazy and this is amazing. You don’t want to be reckless in moments of opportunity, but you sort of want to map out, okay, what does this mean for my community, what does this mean for my wellbeing, what does this mean for what I’m about to dive into, how will this introduce chaos into my life and how does this serve my community? And for me that final point is the most important. Does this serve my community? Does this serve my heart? And I think when we take the orientation of service, when we take the orientation of being in service to others through your career choices, it really presents a different way to analyze how we make choices.

Vinny Eng: And this campaign has given me the opportunity to fall in love with the city all over again. I’m meeting people that have been in communities that I have never been part of, such a deep, beautiful and enriching way. People who have just committed their lives. I mean being in food and wine and being someone that is serving people is a great honor. I love being of service to people, but it’s different. People are paying you to be in service to them. But there have been entire communities of people in San Francisco that have been in service to other people that don’t get anything in return. People who have worked in violence prevention, people who have worked in workforce development, people who have worked in building power for marginalized communities. They don’t get paid for that. They do it out of the generosity of their heart, of wanting to build a safer, kinder, more expansive community for the children that come after them. And that has been so expansive for my heart.

Vinny Eng: So six months in I just, I see the landscape and I’m like, I’m so grateful. I’m so grateful to be supporting their work. They often say it’s one thing to be given a mic, it’s another thing to pass it. Pass the mic. Give it to someone who has been speaking without a mic. They’ve been speaking in a bullhorn. They’ll give them the mic. And the organizers, the activists, the advocates who have been building safety, building justice in this community for decades and their willingness to embrace and invite me to sit on the side. That’s not my table, that’s your table. I’m just here to take notes.

Amy Elisa Jackson: What are some of the surprising similarities between hospitality and advocacy? Are there any bridges? Obvious connections?

Vinny Eng: Recovery. We’re human. We pursue the best and the perfect in our professional and personal careers. And there are just some circumstances and situations that are way beyond your control. And how you navigate when things don’t go as intended is important.

Vinny Eng: And so what I mean by recovery is when mistakes happen, when things, when disagreements happen, when conflicts arise, how do you communicate with someone? How do you recover the common bond that we have, which is we’re human, right? So how do we recover? How do we restore a community that’s divided? How do we restore a situation when parties are in conflict? So there are commonalities. You acknowledge, you name it. I’m really sorry that we find ourselves at this juncture. I want to have this conversation with you, because we are ultimately pursuing similar things. So lay it out for me. Tell me. It’s no different in the restaurant. I’m so sorry that your steak came medium-well and you wanted it rare. Can I have 10 minutes for the kitchen to make a new one for you?

Amy Elisa Jackson: Did you know you had these kind of transferable skills, if you will? Or that so many of the lessons and skills that you had honed in hospitality were going to be in your toolkit, in your arsenal and so helpful now in the work that you’re doing?

Vinny Eng: My “be human” toolbox.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Mm-hmm (affirmative). Your “be human” toolbox.

Vinny Eng: Yeah, I think we all have it. I think it’s really important that you just show up every day as your full self. You be human, you be kind to yourself. Regardless of what situation I find myself in, regardless of what professional role I find myself in, I always say what’s the kindest choice I can make for myself right now? And that’s an important guide. That’s the best tool that you have. What’s the kindest choice I can make? What’s the kindest choice I can make in this moment that does the most good for as many people as possible in as short amount of time as possible? That transfers through every job in every industry, and there is a halo effect. I think it’s really important as we navigate careers and navigate jobs that we think about what the long game is. The long game is that you go home at night and the person that you love, the roommate that you love, the partner that you love, the friend that you love says how’s your day. And you can respond I did the best that I could.

Amy Elisa Jackson: So speaking of long game, do you feel like being an organizing director for Suzy’s campaign is a brief detour or do you envision this being a permanent change? Do you feel like you’re ready to pivot potentially away from hospitality and further into community organizing? Or like you said, do you just feel like there are two sides of the same coin?

Vinny Eng: I’ve always organized in my community. Every time you organize a dinner party that’s community organizing. You know what I mean? So it’s in all of our fabric to organize in our communities, right? This is the thing that was so important to me when I made the transition. I am so grateful that I have such a beloved community in the food and wine profession here in the Bay Area. I love every single person that has made my career possible. And I hope at some point that we will have the opportunity to engage and collaborate again because supporting our farmers is important. Supporting are new emerging queer and communities of color that are coming up in leadership in the food and wine community is so important to me. I’ll be there. I can’t wait to come back. And sometimes it’s like a tour of duty. You get deployed. And so I guess that’s my long-winded way of saying that things haven’t changed.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Good because the foodies who are listening, as well as those who love a good meal and a good glass of wine are relieved right now. They’re breathing a sigh of relief that you have not ditched them for the world of local government. We’re thankful.

Vinny Eng: Don’t ever confine yourself to think that a pathway is the one that you have to commit to. Trust when people show up for your life and trust when people give you the invitation to do something wildly outside anything you ever imagined, that you should consider it and imagine it and think about how it creates community. And if it feels good in your heart, go after it, go for it. Go for it. Because when you take a risk in your personal and professional career, people will show up and support you and push you and hold you accountable. And that’s the thing that comes from this. Love, real love and real meaningful relationships are not just about cheerleading. It’s about accountability.

Amy Elisa Jackson: As you look ahead to 2020, it’s a new decade.

Vinny Eng: Lord, help us.

Amy Elisa Jackson: I know, but as you look ahead, what are you in pursuit of Vinny?

Vinny Eng: Love. Love and forgiveness. I think about this work that I’ve done since 2012 and the thing that’s the tool that has really helped me is forgiveness. You sort of forgive the universe for the things that have caused you the most sadness. When you touched suffering in that way, it’s a gift. It’s a gift to see suffering because then it gives you the opportunity to see how others suffer. And when you see how others suffer, it makes it that much easier for you to love someone that’s not like you.

Vinny Eng: So back to this notion of the other, how can we learn to love people who are other from us, love them in such a way that we can hold space to say I fundamentally disagree with you, you need to do some work about your racism, your transphobia, your homophobia, all the things, that’s your work, not my work, but my work is to love you and to show you that when you’re ready-

Amy Elisa Jackson: …I’m here.

Vinny Eng: … I’m here. I’m going to love you fully, but your work is your work. You got to go do your work. But when you’re ready to receive the love that I am capable of giving you, I am right here.

Vinny Eng: And that requires forgiving someone for not having done the work yet. That requires forgiving someone for saying something hateful, that is hurtful to your heart. That requires forgiving someone for being separate, for being distant, but also knowing that your truth means that you are not their separateness. You are not their hate. You are not their phobia, that you stand in your love and you forgive and you say reconciliation is possible if you show up at this table, you do your work and when you’re done with your work, you come to this table and we’ll build something better. And that’s what we’re all capable of in the choices that we make in our professional and personal lives. We are capable of building something better. You stand in your truth. You stand in your light. You stand in your love, but you over there, you do your work. I will call you out on the things that hurt people. You will not hurt my community. You do your work and when you’re done, come here and let’s build something.

Amy Elisa Jackson: I love that in pursuit of both love and forgiveness in 2020.

Vinny Eng: And in life babe, in life.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Vinny Eng, thank you so very much for taking the time to speak with us here at Glassdoor.

Vinny Eng: Oh my goodness. This is probably one of the strangest, most unconventional conversations you’ve had.

Amy Elisa Jackson: It was fantastic. Thank you so much.

Vinny Eng: I’m so grateful. Thank you for having me.

Amy Elisa Jackson: Thank you for listening to IN PURSUIT the podcast from Glassdoor. This episode was produced by Lee Schneider and Allison Sullivan, music by Epidemic Sound, production by Red Cup Agency. Look for us on Apple Podcast or wherever you get your podcasts. If you’re on Apple Podcasts, don’t forget to share the love, give us some stars and leave a comment. Thanks for listening. I’m Amy Elisa Jackson Jackson, and this is IN PURSUIT.

 

Click to listen now. Listen and subscribe on Apple Podcasts, Google Play, Stitcher, or wherever you get your podcasts.  IN PURSUIT features candid, personal reflections from guests who are looking for answers and evolving to meet the challenges life throws at them. You’ll get inspiring conversations about life and career. If you have a question or feedback for us, message us on Twitter (@glassdoor, using the hashtag #InPursuitPod).

by MMS Group
0Comments

IOO stuff about job hunting is good to read who agrees?

People often find comfort in black-and-white thinking. While choosing from two clearly defined categories might seem easy, the truth is, it rarely serves you well. Rather than black and white, the world is largely composed of shades of gray, or even different colors entirely — this is especially true when it comes to gender. To apply this-or-that thinking to gender is to deny the existence and experiences of a broad range of individuals: those who are genderqueer, non-binary, agender, gender-nonconforming or anything between or outside the male/female gender spectrum.

If you identify as a member of one of those groups, you may be all too familiar with that sort of thinking, including at work. It’s not always easy to be an LGBTQ+ individual in the workplace, and identifying outside of the traditional gender spectrum comes with its own unique challenges. You might find your pronouns, attire and expression being invalidated, unintentionally or not, by your colleagues.

The good news? The increased visibility of non-binary identities means that more companies and employees are opening up their minds. So if you’re a gender-nonconforming individual, or just an ally, there are more opportunities for you to bring your authentic self to work than ever. But how, exactly, do you go about doing that?

We chatted with Sam Brandt, a Technical Writer at life insurance startup Haven Life who is genderqueer and has openly identified as such in their last two workplaces. Our conversation below covers advocating for yourself in the workplace, evaluating companies for inclusion and how to support your trans and gender-nonconforming colleagues at work — here are the highlights.

Glassdoor: Can you talk a little bit about how being a genderqueer, non-binary individual has impacted your career journey thus far?

Sam Brandt: I’ve identified as genderqueer since college, but I only decided to change my pronouns in 2015. That was the first thing that I did that affected not only how other people talk to me, but how I’m talked about. When I came out and started to change my pronouns, though, I didn’t do it at the company where I worked at the time. I’d had several indications that it wouldn’t really go over well, and that it would be asking a lot from the leadership team to try and get them on my side. So I held off, and then around that time I moved to New York City.

After I moved to New York, I put my pronouns on my resume and on my LinkedIn profile because I wanted to make it very clear to wherever I applied that these are my pronouns and if you question whether or not you want to hire me because of it, I don’t even want to hear from you. If you think that’s going to be too difficult for you, don’t even call me, because I wanted to bring my entire self to work. I had a good experience with all of my coworkers at the company I ended up working for — I wasn’t afraid of using my pronouns and I didn’t have any problems.

Then I was actually recruited to Haven Life, which was cool because they already knew about my pronouns and they wanted to make sure I was comfortable. I actually had a brief conversation with the head of our people and culture team and she asked if I had any questions or if I had anything I wanted to talk about — they made sure that I knew I could ask, and they were on my side.

Glassdoor: That’s great to hear. What has working at Haven Life been like since that initial interview experience?

Sam Brandt: I started on January 2nd, and they sent a little blurb about me on Slack that included my pronouns and a few fun facts about myself. It was on a day where a lot of people were still out of town for the holidays, though. After a month or two, I felt like I was getting stared at a lot. I was having to have the pronoun correction conversation a lot so I went to Janna, the Head of People & Culture, and told her I thought we could do something about it. She sent an email to all the tech leads asking them to talk to everyone in their group and say something like, “We have a new employee and they use these pronouns. Can you try to be aware of it?” which was awesome.

Janna and her team also started putting their pronouns in their email signatures, which was great. And then I suggested to them that we put pronouns in our face gallery, which is an image gallery of everyone at the company with bios included. That was amazing because it wasn’t just singling out my bio as different — everyone’s got their pronouns in theirs. People here want to do the right thing. If I have to correct anybody, they always apologize and we just move forward. It’s been a really good experience.

Not every person you look at may identify in the way that you see them. 

Glassdoor: Have you always taken such an active role in educating your colleagues about gender identity, or is it something you’ve had to work up to over time?

Sam Brandt: I’ve always been in employee resource groups for queer and trans employees, but it was only with my own pronoun change that I’ve had to really become an advocate. Within employee resource groups you do events and things, but getting people to use the right pronoun for you can be an everyday challenge. I don’t always correct people. I’m not talking to every barista that says “Ma’am, can I help you?” or “Sir, can I get something for you?” I don’t have the time for that. But at work, I see all these people 40 or more hours a week. It’s important to me to make sure not only that they know this about me, but that I create a space where anyone who comes in after me doesn’t see it as quite as much of a challenge — that more people know that some people use different or alternative pronouns.

So it is something I’ve worked up to over time, but I had a lot of help and that is so important. It makes it easier to step forward in confidence and say, “This is who I am,” and know that I have the backing of the people here. People here are open and respectful and on my side, which is not always the case, and that can really help make someone more comfortable advocating for themselves.

Glassdoor: Deciding whether or not to come out in the workplace can be tough. In your experience, what are a few signs that a company is likely to be accepting and supportive? Conversely, what are some red flags that a company will NOT be accepting or supportive?

Sam Brandt: You can always ask questions in your interviews and you should, because you’re shopping around just as much as they are. Find out if they have an employee resource group or if they have gender-neutral or all-gender restrooms available. That’s one thing I’m lucky for here, we have a gender-neutral single bathroom. It’s nice because having to make that conscious decision of going into a restroom that isn’t aligned with my gender is something I deal with all the time, and I didn’t realize how much of a relief it was to not have to think about it. You can also ask if they cover medical transition costs and if anyone at the company has transitioned or come out before. One of the things that made me comfortable at my last company was that I knew that two women had come out and transitioned before I got there so there were two other trans people at the company.

Another thing that people can do is use their base instincts. Think about how comfortable you are in you interview. How do people introduce themselves when they meet you? Do they add their pronoun, or is it listed somewhere? Do they seem weirded out when you add your pronoun? If the people interviewing you sort of blow by your pronouns and your identity, they’re likely going to continue to be uncomfortable. Sometimes a company that says all the right things will still have employees that don’t treat you well, or a company that says the wrong thing may be staffed with employees who care a lot, so it’s not simple. I say trust your gut and also know that your experience as a non-binary person or gender-fluid person is valid.

Glassdoor: Of course, coming out is an experience that’s always unique to the individual — but do you have any broad pieces of advice or words of wisdom for individuals who are in the process of doing so?

Sam Brandt: Coming out in the workplace is about bringing your whole self to work. You’re valuable — they’re hiring you not just for your job experience or skill set but for your knowledge, including your knowledge about yourself. Don’t be afraid to see that as a value that you bring to the table. If you decide to come out and you want to make changes in your organization, find people who are allies at the company. It’s really easy to burn out if you try to deal with pushback by yourself, and it will make you feel stronger to have people who you can go to, even if it’s just to vent when you’re struggling.

You’re going to have days where it seems really difficult, and you’re going to be tasked with people who consistently get it wrong. That doesn’t mean they aren’t trying, though — some people get scared. I have a very nice coworker who misgendered me the first moment I met her, but she had no way of knowing — I’m bad at remembering to add my pronouns as part of an introduction — and I said, oh, no, actually my pronouns are they, them. She froze over, apologized, felt really bad and then avoided me for four months because she was so embarrassed. There are a few jerks out there you’re going to encounter and that’s tough, but a lot of times people do want to do the right thing — they want to treat you with respect and when they mess up, they’re mortified. I think just recognizing that it’s mostly about them and not about me has really helped.

We should broaden our understanding of each other and the world, even if some changes challenge you.

Glassdoor: Some people want to be supportive but are unsure how to do so. What do you think are some of the best ways employees can show up as allies for their trans and gender-nonconforming colleagues?

Sam Brandt: For individuals, I would say introduce yourself with your pronouns, put your pronouns in your Twitter bio, put them in your email signature. Putting your pronouns out there shows that you understand that pronouns matter and they’re not just something you can assume about each other. Then, just accept that you might have to be corrected over and over again. It’s not only frustrating for you, it’s frustrating for the person. Everybody feels differently, but for me being misgendered is like listening to music and someone plays an incredibly wrong note.

I talked with that same coworker who panicked and then avoided me because she felt so bad — she told me that she didn’t want to mess up. Her husband suggested that she tell him a story about me every day to practice using the right pronouns. My heart warmed so much when she told me that. Another friend told me that he would just stop dead in the middle of a sentence when he got my pronouns wrong and just repeat the whole sentence again with the correct pronouns. It’s about being deliberate and thinking before you make assumptions. When people started coming out more about their sexual orientation in the workplace, people had to learn that not every man they work with is married to a woman, and vice versa. It’s the same way with gender — not every person you look at may identify in the way that you see them. 

Glassdoor: What about employers — how can they create a sense of inclusion and belonging for trans and gender-nonconforming employees?

Sam Brandt: For employers, I’d say think about gender-neutral bathrooms, transitioning policies, what your health plan includes and adding pronouns in bios, introductions and email signatures, and then making sure your human resources people are advocates for their employees. I also think that when companies are selecting partners or vendors, they should ask, “What do you do for your employees? How do you help everyone at your company come to work as themselves, or help affirm your consumers?” Companies can use their leverage, their power, their money to be advocates for their employees.

Glassdoor: Is there anything else on your mind right now?

Sam Brandt: I think it’s easier than people think to make their non-binary, gender non-conforming, genderqueer and trans coworkers feel respected. Maybe it takes a little extra thought before you speak — a little more revision — but I don’t think that’s a bad thing. Many people want to act like everything we do should be easy, and if it’s not easy, we shouldn’t actively challenge it because we don’t want to be a burden. But that’s not what I want. I think we should broaden our understanding of each other and the world, even if some changes challenge you.

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Open Jobs at Haven Life

UX/UI Designer
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
Full Stack Developer
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
QA Manual Engineer
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
Front End Developer
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
DevSecOps
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
User Experience Designer
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
Site Reliability Engineer
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
Data Analyst
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
Legal Counsel
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
Pricing and Technology Actuary
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h

by MMS Group
0Comments

I always want to share anything related to job hunting

People often find comfort in black-and-white thinking. While choosing from two clearly defined categories might seem easy, the truth is, it rarely serves you well. Rather than black and white, the world is largely composed of shades of gray, or even different colors entirely — this is especially true when it comes to gender. To apply this-or-that thinking to gender is to deny the existence and experiences of a broad range of individuals: those who are genderqueer, non-binary, agender, gender-nonconforming or anything between or outside the male/female gender spectrum.

If you identify as a member of one of those groups, you may be all too familiar with that sort of thinking, including at work. It’s not always easy to be an LGBTQ+ individual in the workplace, and identifying outside of the traditional gender spectrum comes with its own unique challenges. You might find your pronouns, attire and expression being invalidated, unintentionally or not, by your colleagues.

The good news? The increased visibility of non-binary identities means that more companies and employees are opening up their minds. So if you’re a gender-nonconforming individual, or just an ally, there are more opportunities for you to bring your authentic self to work than ever. But how, exactly, do you go about doing that?

We chatted with Sam Brandt, a Technical Writer at life insurance startup Haven Life who is genderqueer and has openly identified as such in their last two workplaces. Our conversation below covers advocating for yourself in the workplace, evaluating companies for inclusion and how to support your trans and gender-nonconforming colleagues at work — here are the highlights.

Glassdoor: Can you talk a little bit about how being a genderqueer, non-binary individual has impacted your career journey thus far?

Sam Brandt: I’ve identified as genderqueer since college, but I only decided to change my pronouns in 2015. That was the first thing that I did that affected not only how other people talk to me, but how I’m talked about. When I came out and started to change my pronouns, though, I didn’t do it at the company where I worked at the time. I’d had several indications that it wouldn’t really go over well, and that it would be asking a lot from the leadership team to try and get them on my side. So I held off, and then around that time I moved to New York City.

After I moved to New York, I put my pronouns on my resume and on my LinkedIn profile because I wanted to make it very clear to wherever I applied that these are my pronouns and if you question whether or not you want to hire me because of it, I don’t even want to hear from you. If you think that’s going to be too difficult for you, don’t even call me, because I wanted to bring my entire self to work. I had a good experience with all of my coworkers at the company I ended up working for — I wasn’t afraid of using my pronouns and I didn’t have any problems.

Then I was actually recruited to Haven Life, which was cool because they already knew about my pronouns and they wanted to make sure I was comfortable. I actually had a brief conversation with the head of our people and culture team and she asked if I had any questions or if I had anything I wanted to talk about — they made sure that I knew I could ask, and they were on my side.

Glassdoor: That’s great to hear. What has working at Haven Life been like since that initial interview experience?

Sam Brandt: I started on January 2nd, and they sent a little blurb about me on Slack that included my pronouns and a few fun facts about myself. It was on a day where a lot of people were still out of town for the holidays, though. After a month or two, I felt like I was getting stared at a lot. I was having to have the pronoun correction conversation a lot so I went to Janna, the Head of People & Culture, and told her I thought we could do something about it. She sent an email to all the tech leads asking them to talk to everyone in their group and say something like, “We have a new employee and they use these pronouns. Can you try to be aware of it?” which was awesome.

Janna and her team also started putting their pronouns in their email signatures, which was great. And then I suggested to them that we put pronouns in our face gallery, which is an image gallery of everyone at the company with bios included. That was amazing because it wasn’t just singling out my bio as different — everyone’s got their pronouns in theirs. People here want to do the right thing. If I have to correct anybody, they always apologize and we just move forward. It’s been a really good experience.

Not every person you look at may identify in the way that you see them. 

Glassdoor: Have you always taken such an active role in educating your colleagues about gender identity, or is it something you’ve had to work up to over time?

Sam Brandt: I’ve always been in employee resource groups for queer and trans employees, but it was only with my own pronoun change that I’ve had to really become an advocate. Within employee resource groups you do events and things, but getting people to use the right pronoun for you can be an everyday challenge. I don’t always correct people. I’m not talking to every barista that says “Ma’am, can I help you?” or “Sir, can I get something for you?” I don’t have the time for that. But at work, I see all these people 40 or more hours a week. It’s important to me to make sure not only that they know this about me, but that I create a space where anyone who comes in after me doesn’t see it as quite as much of a challenge — that more people know that some people use different or alternative pronouns.

So it is something I’ve worked up to over time, but I had a lot of help and that is so important. It makes it easier to step forward in confidence and say, “This is who I am,” and know that I have the backing of the people here. People here are open and respectful and on my side, which is not always the case, and that can really help make someone more comfortable advocating for themselves.

Glassdoor: Deciding whether or not to come out in the workplace can be tough. In your experience, what are a few signs that a company is likely to be accepting and supportive? Conversely, what are some red flags that a company will NOT be accepting or supportive?

Sam Brandt: You can always ask questions in your interviews and you should, because you’re shopping around just as much as they are. Find out if they have an employee resource group or if they have gender-neutral or all-gender restrooms available. That’s one thing I’m lucky for here, we have a gender-neutral single bathroom. It’s nice because having to make that conscious decision of going into a restroom that isn’t aligned with my gender is something I deal with all the time, and I didn’t realize how much of a relief it was to not have to think about it. You can also ask if they cover medical transition costs and if anyone at the company has transitioned or come out before. One of the things that made me comfortable at my last company was that I knew that two women had come out and transitioned before I got there so there were two other trans people at the company.

Another thing that people can do is use their base instincts. Think about how comfortable you are in you interview. How do people introduce themselves when they meet you? Do they add their pronoun, or is it listed somewhere? Do they seem weirded out when you add your pronoun? If the people interviewing you sort of blow by your pronouns and your identity, they’re likely going to continue to be uncomfortable. Sometimes a company that says all the right things will still have employees that don’t treat you well, or a company that says the wrong thing may be staffed with employees who care a lot, so it’s not simple. I say trust your gut and also know that your experience as a non-binary person or gender-fluid person is valid.

Glassdoor: Of course, coming out is an experience that’s always unique to the individual — but do you have any broad pieces of advice or words of wisdom for individuals who are in the process of doing so?

Sam Brandt: Coming out in the workplace is about bringing your whole self to work. You’re valuable — they’re hiring you not just for your job experience or skill set but for your knowledge, including your knowledge about yourself. Don’t be afraid to see that as a value that you bring to the table. If you decide to come out and you want to make changes in your organization, find people who are allies at the company. It’s really easy to burn out if you try to deal with pushback by yourself, and it will make you feel stronger to have people who you can go to, even if it’s just to vent when you’re struggling.

You’re going to have days where it seems really difficult, and you’re going to be tasked with people who consistently get it wrong. That doesn’t mean they aren’t trying, though — some people get scared. I have a very nice coworker who misgendered me the first moment I met her, but she had no way of knowing — I’m bad at remembering to add my pronouns as part of an introduction — and I said, oh, no, actually my pronouns are they, them. She froze over, apologized, felt really bad and then avoided me for four months because she was so embarrassed. There are a few jerks out there you’re going to encounter and that’s tough, but a lot of times people do want to do the right thing — they want to treat you with respect and when they mess up, they’re mortified. I think just recognizing that it’s mostly about them and not about me has really helped.

We should broaden our understanding of each other and the world, even if some changes challenge you.

Glassdoor: Some people want to be supportive but are unsure how to do so. What do you think are some of the best ways employees can show up as allies for their trans and gender-nonconforming colleagues?

Sam Brandt: For individuals, I would say introduce yourself with your pronouns, put your pronouns in your Twitter bio, put them in your email signature. Putting your pronouns out there shows that you understand that pronouns matter and they’re not just something you can assume about each other. Then, just accept that you might have to be corrected over and over again. It’s not only frustrating for you, it’s frustrating for the person. Everybody feels differently, but for me being misgendered is like listening to music and someone plays an incredibly wrong note.

I talked with that same coworker who panicked and then avoided me because she felt so bad — she told me that she didn’t want to mess up. Her husband suggested that she tell him a story about me every day to practice using the right pronouns. My heart warmed so much when she told me that. Another friend told me that he would just stop dead in the middle of a sentence when he got my pronouns wrong and just repeat the whole sentence again with the correct pronouns. It’s about being deliberate and thinking before you make assumptions. When people started coming out more about their sexual orientation in the workplace, people had to learn that not every man they work with is married to a woman, and vice versa. It’s the same way with gender — not every person you look at may identify in the way that you see them. 

Glassdoor: What about employers — how can they create a sense of inclusion and belonging for trans and gender-nonconforming employees?

Sam Brandt: For employers, I’d say think about gender-neutral bathrooms, transitioning policies, what your health plan includes and adding pronouns in bios, introductions and email signatures, and then making sure your human resources people are advocates for their employees. I also think that when companies are selecting partners or vendors, they should ask, “What do you do for your employees? How do you help everyone at your company come to work as themselves, or help affirm your consumers?” Companies can use their leverage, their power, their money to be advocates for their employees.

Glassdoor: Is there anything else on your mind right now?

Sam Brandt: I think it’s easier than people think to make their non-binary, gender non-conforming, genderqueer and trans coworkers feel respected. Maybe it takes a little extra thought before you speak — a little more revision — but I don’t think that’s a bad thing. Many people want to act like everything we do should be easy, and if it’s not easy, we shouldn’t actively challenge it because we don’t want to be a burden. But that’s not what I want. I think we should broaden our understanding of each other and the world, even if some changes challenge you.

Evergreen Banner 1

Open Jobs at Haven Life

Pricing and Technology Actuary
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
DevSecOps
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
Data Analyst
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
Full Stack Developer
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
Front End Developer
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
Product Actuary
Haven Life
Boston, MA
23 hours ago 23h
QA Manual Engineer
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
Legal Counsel
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
UX/UI Designer
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h
User Experience Designer
Haven Life
New York, NY
23 hours ago 23h

by MMS Group